<![CDATA[Totally Rad! Blog]]> http://www.gettotallyrad.com Photoshop Plugins, Presets & Actions Tue, 04 Aug 2015 00:00:00 -0400 en-us hello@gettotallyrad.com (TR Webmaster) Copyright 2015 3600 <![CDATA[Mirrorless Magic]]> http://www.gettotallyrad.com/blog/mirrorless-magic http://www.gettotallyrad.com/blog/mirrorless-magic post Tue, 04 Aug 2015 00:00:00 -0400 <![CDATA[Keep Calm]]> http://www.gettotallyrad.com/blog/keep-calm http://www.gettotallyrad.com/blog/keep-calm post Tue, 07 Jul 2015 00:00:00 -0400

Photographer, mom and educator, Summer Murdock, shares with us her approach to photographing kids and how she uses Replichrome to process her stunning images.

summermurdock_26 summermurdock_13
 

Tell us about yourself, both personally and professionally. How long have you been making photos? How did you get started?

I am a wife, mom, of four kids, a family photographer based outside of Salt Lake City, Utah, and an online workshop teacher. I love a good adventure and try to get outside and explore as much as I can. I have been making photos for almost 8 years now. I think I have always had it in me though. I used to walk around my neighborhood as a kid with my 110mm wind up camera, taking pictures of my dolls among all kinds of other rather boring things. Maybe this isn’t all that uncommon but I remember the sense of enjoyment that it brought me even though I wasn’t making anything that was good.  I also remember going to art galleries as a kid and teenager and really gravitating towards the photography exhibits. It has always pulled me. I took a couple classes including a b&w film class back in college. I considered it as my major but my fear of what I perceived as a super cut throat and competitive business scared me away. I let my practical side take over. That is one of my few regrets in life. Almost 8 years ago, I became a bit obsessed with making images. Partly it was because I wanted to capture my children’s lives in a meaningful way, but it has become more than that now. It has become a creative outlet for me that is more fulfilling than I ever imagined it could be. It has become a part of who I am and how I see now.

summermurdock_18

What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

I love to photograph kids and light. Obviously my own kids are a huge inspiration to me but I love to photograph all kids. Particularly young kids. I love how they see the world with such fresh eyes. Everything is new and full of wonder to them. I remember being that way as a kid and having that feeling when you wake up and think that this might be the most amazing day yet. I try really hard to live my life as an adult that way but, let’s be honest, that’s no easy feat. Light is another thing that is a huge inspiration to me. I often feel like it’s a more dominant part of some of my images than the people are.

summermurdock_05 summermurdock_25

Your photos have an amazing calmness to them.  Can you explain a little about your process for making photos and how you select the images that you show to the world?

I have four kids so my life is chaotic at times. There is hardly ever quiet at my house. I think I seek out calm in my photos because I long for more calm in my life. I tend to be attracted to the quiet parts of movement, the moment right before or after something happens. I rarely shoot subjects that are standing still. Even my portraits are usually captured as someone is walking and I say “stop and look at me.” I find I get much more authentic and real expressions that way.

My process for making photos is pretty simple actually. My photos usually happen from following my curio. I am a pretty curious person. I have been shooting for a while now and I although I do go though ruts or periods where i feel “uninspired”  I still feel pretty excited about taking pictures. I have learned that when I have that little voice in my head that says “oh wow, that is really cool or interesting looking” that that is my cue to run and grab my camera even when I don’t feel like it.  Shooting in this way has kept me shooting and enjoying it for almost eight years and I think I love it more now than when I started. It keeps me energized and always pushing myself to try new things and get better.

I share all kinds of images with the world. My only criteria for what I should share and what I shouldn’t would be “do i like this? Is this interesting to me in some way?” I try really hard to just go with my gut and not second guess myself too much. Of course, I am more thoughtful about what images I put in my portfolio, but we live in an interesting world of over-sharing with all the social media outlets and people taking pictures every single day. I am one that thinks it’s actually good for photography. If people are constantly shooting and getting better, they are raising the bar for us all. Growth is a good thing always.

summermurdock_04

Talk a little about your approach to post-processing.  What are your preferred tools? How do you know when an image is “finished?”

My approach to post processing is get it right in camera so I don’t have to spend a lot of time editing. If you have interesting light in your images, you often don’t need to edit much. I’d rather be out shooting and exploring than sitting at my computer. The Replichrome presets are some of my go-to tools. I use them on a daily basis. They add the extra something my images need while still making them look natural. I use Bridge, Adobe Camera Raw, and Photoshop as my editing tools. Most of the time I just open my images in ACR apply a preset, tweak a few things, and then save it straight from there and am done.   If it needs further tweaking I open in Photoshop.  Editing is something that I almost feel my way though; it’s fluid and every image has to be dealt with on a case by case basis. Mostly I know it’s done when I look at it and think “that’s it.” I just know it when I see it.

summermurdock_12 summermurdock_11 summermurdock_16
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<![CDATA[Announcing Replichrome III: Archive]]> http://www.gettotallyrad.com/blog/announcing-replichrome-iii-archive http://www.gettotallyrad.com/blog/announcing-replichrome-iii-archive post Tue, 21 Apr 2015 00:00:00 -0400

We are proud to introduce Replichrome III: Archive , a collection of 22 rare films sourced from across the world. We curated a selection of eclectic, hard-to-find films and hand-crafted them to give photographers a collection of film emulation presets not found anywhere else. , a collection of 22 rare films sourced from across the world. We curated a selection of eclectic, hard-to-find films and hand-crafted them to give photographers a collection of film emulation presets not found anywhere else.

For a limited time, we are offering Replichrome III at a reduced Introductory Price of $69 . Ends April 30. . Ends April 30.

Buy Now & Save

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<![CDATA[Take a Trip]]> http://www.gettotallyrad.com/blog/take-a-trip http://www.gettotallyrad.com/blog/take-a-trip post Fri, 27 Mar 2015 00:00:00 -0400 Totally Rad Featured Photographer

Photographer and Replichrome fanatic, Ryan Longnecker , was chosen to document this year’s Field Trip , a summit for photographers and creatives to connect and create. Ryan brought his documentary style and insider’s point of view to create a series of images that leave us dying to visit Field Trip next year.

Totally Rad Featured Photographer
Totally Rad Featured Photographer

What was your approach to shooting Field Trip? What were some of the biggest challenges?

I wanted to immerse myself in the camper’s perspective and try to get a cross section of the scale of what’s offered. I also wanted to connect with the attendees well enough that I didn’t feel like an annoyance, but instead, a friend and fellow creative. Some of the biggest challenges were trying to capture people and the location when light was the best - there was just so much happening that in those windows of time for good light I was still scooting around in my golf cart trying to capture some of the 20 classes/1on1’s/live shoots/craft-making happening at any moment. It was also tough to really follow any of the campers around to get them sharing those “escape” moments where they were able to get portraits of each other. My boundaries were drawn by the schedule so I wasn’t able to peel away as often as I might have if I were just attending. I wanted to immerse myself in the camper’s perspective and try to get a cross section of the scale of what’s offered. I also wanted to connect with the attendees well enough that I didn’t feel like an annoyance, but instead, a friend and fellow creative. Some of the biggest challenges were trying to capture people and the location when light was the best - there was just so much happening that in those windows of time for good light I was still scooting around in my golf cart trying to capture some of the 20 classes/1on1’s/live shoots/craft-making happening at any moment. It was also tough to really follow any of the campers around to get them sharing those “escape” moments where they were able to get portraits of each other. My boundaries were drawn by the schedule so I wasn’t able to peel away as often as I might have if I were just attending.

What surprised you about photographing at Field Trip?

I was surprised at how relaxed the personalities were of some of my creative heroes. I stepped back and watched them share meals with people who are just beginning in the industry - or, who maybe have hit a creative wall - and just talked life with them, heard their stories, had a late night bowl of cereal, and danced with them (like really hard party dancing). I was surprised at how relaxed the personalities were of some of my creative heroes. I stepped back and watched them share meals with people who are just beginning in the industry - or, who maybe have hit a creative wall - and just talked life with them, heard their stories, had a late night bowl of cereal, and danced with them (like really hard party dancing).

Totally Rad Featured Photographer
Totally Rad Featured Photographer

Explain your approach to processing the images. What were you going for? How did you achieve that?

All of the color images were processed with Replichrome Fuji 800Z Noritzu+ and all of the BW images were processed with either Kodak Plus-X 125++ (for the cleaner and night look) or Tri-X++ (for daytime and moody looks). I was going for a look that felt tactile and classic, like old family travel photos but that definitely captured the colors, scale, and moments of the event. I think I get that by always having an itchy shutter finger and my head on a swivel for people laughing, throwing chalk on themselves, jumping in the ocean, or whatever unscheduled fun might be happening. I tend towards having a less faded look so the technical side of it is always dropping the shadows/black slider and since I shoot warm sometimes the greens are too present and I adjust the camera calibration shadows to be slightly more magenta. I also will occasionally relax the grain and add lens corrections. But that’s pretty much it. Fuji 800Z Noritzu+ and all of the BW images were processed with either Kodak Plus-X 125++ (for the cleaner and night look) or Tri-X++ (for daytime and moody looks). I was going for a look that felt tactile and classic, like old family travel photos but that definitely captured the colors, scale, and moments of the event. I think I get that by always having an itchy shutter finger and my head on a swivel for people laughing, throwing chalk on themselves, jumping in the ocean, or whatever unscheduled fun might be happening. I tend towards having a less faded look so the technical side of it is always dropping the shadows/black slider and since I shoot warm sometimes the greens are too present and I adjust the camera calibration shadows to be slightly more magenta. I also will occasionally relax the grain and add lens corrections. But that’s pretty much it.

Totally Rad Featured Photographer
Totally Rad Featured Photographer
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<![CDATA[#candyminimal]]> http://www.gettotallyrad.com/blog/candyminimal http://www.gettotallyrad.com/blog/candyminimal post Thu, 19 Mar 2015 00:00:00 -0400 Totally Rad Featured Photographer

Photographer Matt Crump has turned his love for punchy colors and minimal compositions in to an Instagram phenomenon. Read below to learn more about his #candyminimal style and how he uses RadLab to create his signature style.

Totally Rad Featured Photographer
Totally Rad Featured Photographer

What inspired the Candy Grid series? Can you explain a little about how you styled/executed the shoot?

I wanted to do something fun and unexpected for Halloween last year, so instead of photographing fun costumes or scary stuff, I focused on everyone’s favorite part of the holiday: candy. I also wanted to experiment with arrangement art, so I thought this would be the perfect time to try it. I bought every kind of candy I could think of and then came up with a minimalist design concept on solid-colored backgrounds for each photo. I wanted to do something fun and unexpected for Halloween last year, so instead of photographing fun costumes or scary stuff, I focused on everyone’s favorite part of the holiday: candy. I also wanted to experiment with arrangement art, so I thought this would be the perfect time to try it. I bought every kind of candy I could think of and then came up with a minimalist design concept on solid-colored backgrounds for each photo.

What were some of the challenges you faced in doing this series? What surprised you?

Getting jelly beans to stay still is hard. One tiny nudge and your perfectly arranged composition is now rolling across the floor in every direction. Another challenge was not eating my art supplies. The most surprising part of the series was the interaction I got from my followers. Before I started the series, I took requests for what candies I should use, and lots and lots of people wanted to see their favorite candies on my feed. Getting jelly beans to stay still is hard. One tiny nudge and your perfectly arranged composition is now rolling across the floor in every direction. Another challenge was not eating my art supplies. The most surprising part of the series was the interaction I got from my followers. Before I started the series, I took requests for what candies I should use, and lots and lots of people wanted to see their favorite candies on my feed.

Totally Rad Featured Photographer
Totally Rad Featured Photographer

Originally, your #candyminimal shots were edited with mobile apps, (I think?) can you explain why you switched to editing them on the desktop and where RadLab comes in?

I hit a plateau in terms of the quality I could achieve on mobile, and I wanted to keep growing as an artist. Desktop editing is more elegant and rich, and you can quickly do things on a desktop that would take a long time on mobile. I’m not bashing mobile editing: it’s how I got my start and it taught me the basics of editing, but stepping up from mobile has improved the quality of my work. As a mobile photographer, I love filters, and that’s why I use RadLab . It gives me lots of control over every aspect of each filter—something you can’t achieve on mobile. . It gives me lots of control over every aspect of each filter—something you can’t achieve on mobile.

Totally Rad Featured Photographer
Totally Rad Featured Photographer
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<![CDATA[Kamp]]> http://www.gettotallyrad.com/blog/kamp http://www.gettotallyrad.com/blog/kamp post Thu, 05 Feb 2015 00:00:00 -0500

Kampphotography had a start similar to other wedding photographers in the business. Rookies with little shooting experience, they photographed the wedding of a friend and got bit by the photography bug.. Ten years later, the Kampphotography team of Jake, Jess, and Dwayne, now have over 400 weddings under their belt.

“It’s such an amazing feeling capturing a part of someone’s history,” said Jake.  “Knowing that there is a good chance that generations of families will view the photographs we capture.” Even with such a high volume of wedding and engagement shoots, Jake still considers editing a satisfying part of the job. Jake uses the editing process to analyze, sort, and take note of what works and what doesn’t. “I don’t dwell on a photo to decide if its worth saving or using. I always like to think that each frame is a single frame from a motion picture,” says Jake. “I always hope that in a person’s mind, when they view the image, they see the motion and imagine the frame before and the frame after.”

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<![CDATA[Shaping A Scene With Warm And Cool Colors]]> http://www.gettotallyrad.com/blog/shaping-a-scene-with-warm-and-cool-colors http://www.gettotallyrad.com/blog/shaping-a-scene-with-warm-and-cool-colors post Tue, 03 Feb 2015 00:00:00 -0500

One of the hallmarks of a strong photo is that your eye is guided through the photo. As a viewer, you know instinctively where to look because the photo has been crafted to make you look there. There’s a giant bag of tools you have as a photographer to control where the viewer looks, including:

  • Composition (including cropping)
  • Level of detail (background blur, for instance - or choice of a plain background)
  • Contrasty vs flat tones
  • Light vs dark
  • Saturated vs muted colors / color contrast
  • Warm vs cool colors

All of these are elements of an image that you can tweak in post-production to help enhance your original vision. Often careful use of these tools will be the difference between a strong photo and a meh one. In this post, we’ll be concentrating on warm and cool colors. Using some simple tricks, you can subtly shape the colors in a photo to control where the viewer looks, and to give additional reinforcement to your composition. This trick is employed subtly in movie color grading (and on-set lighting choices), but nowhere is it more evident (and heavy-handed) than in Hollywood movie posters:

movie-poster-warm-cool

Here’s how you do it:

1 - Find an appropriate image

First of all, this only really works with color images. Second, for the technique to not be TOO obvious, it should be an image that isn’t super monochromatic. You want to skew the color palette subtly toward warm or cool colors, and with an image that isn’t very colorful, you run the risk of just painting things orange or blue (which can be a neat effect as well). Finally, make sure it has a pretty neutral color balance to begin with. Photos that are already pretty warm or cool can still benefit from this technique, though you might want to use two cooling layers, or two warming layers, to achieve the right balance.

warm-cool-step-1

2 - Develop a plan

Warm colors stand out. Cool colors recede. The rule here is that your subject should be warmer than the other background information. Analyze your image to decide what you want to stand out, and what you want to recede into the background. If your answer is “everything should stand out”, then you need to step back and think about your image, because that’s almost always an indication that your composition is weak, or that you don’t really have a photo of anything interesting. OK, so you have a plan now. Let’s get our hands dirty…

3 - Create cooling layer

In Photoshop, you can use the Cool As A Cucumber action from our original action set (TRA1). Alternately, just use a curves, levels, photo filter, or other method of your choice to create a layer that warms the colors in the entire image. There’s no wrong way to do it, though I still think the best results come from a simple curves adjustment. You’ll want something that looks like this:

cooling-curve

Essentially, you’re adding some blue, and removing some red from the photo.

4 - Paint the cooling effect off the subject

Select the layer mask for the cooling layer you just created (it’s usually selected already). Select the brush tool (just press “B”). Now set your black as your foreground color. The easiest way to do this is just press “D” to set the Default colors, then press “X” to swap your foreground and background color. Make sure your brush is set to something reasonable, settings-wise. I, personally, prefer a soft, medium-sized brush (just a little smaller than the face of your subject), with 100% opacity and 30%-ish flow. Like this:

reasonable-brush-settings

Once your brush is set up, just click and drag in the photo to paint over your subjects. By using your brush this way, you’re making the layer mask darker, which removes the effect from the photo where you brush. In this case, you’re removing the cooling effect from the subject, so it only applies to the background.

A quick tip here: you usually have to go back and forth a bit to refine your mask, because there’s usually spillover onto the background, which creates a noticeable “halo” effect. This is bad. Typically, I will make a quick pass with a large brush over the subject. Then, I’ll hit X to swap white back as my foreground color, and reduce my brush size for greater precision. This means the effect will be a added back where I paint. I’ll use the white brush to clean up the areas where the subject and background meet. Then, if needed, you can swap colors again, going back and forth refining the mask until you don’t notice the effect at the edges.

Another quick tip: use the bracket keys [ ] to adjust your brush size.Finally, there are a LOT of different ways to make a mask in Photoshop. This method is perhaps the least precise, but it’s also the fastest, and most of the time, for effects like this, it gets the job done. Finally, there are a LOT of different ways to make a mask in Photoshop. This method is perhaps the least precise, but it’s also the fastest, and most of the time, for effects like this, it gets the job done.

So, at this point, your photo should look like this:

warm-cool-step-2

Create a warming layer, and invert the layer mask

Create another layer with a warming effect. Again, if you’re using our actions, Warm It Up, Kris will do nicely. Otherwise, just do the opposite of what you did for the cooling layer. However, this time we are going to invert the layer mask so it doesn’t apply anywhere in the photo, and then paint it back in. Select the layer mask and press Cmd-I (Ctrl-I on Windows). The layer mask turns black, and the warming effect vanishes from the photo.

Paint additional warmth onto subject.

The procedure for this is nearly identical to the cooling layer above, with the exception that we are going to paint the effect onto the image where we want it, instead of erasing it from where we don’t want. Why do we do this? Because the subject takes up less space than the background, and this way we save ourselves some work.

Now that we’ve added some warmth to the subject, the photo looks like this:

warm-cool-step-3

Finishing Touches

Though we could keep going with other techniques, let’s stop here for today. Before we do, though, let’s add a tad more contrast to the image. The additional contrast will increase color saturation in a natural-looking way, and help to increase the difference between the warm and cool areas.

warm-cool-step-4

Subtle difference, but a very natural-looking one. If I were to keep going on this image, I’d also use some dodging and burning, some contrast control, and some other subtle tricks to further strengthen the image, because getting post-production right is usually a matter of making a whole lot of small tweaks. Remember, you want to see the photo, not the Photoshop.

Here’s a little gif showing all 4 steps, so you can get an idea of how the image progresses.

cool-warm-steps-animated

Any interest in seeing a Lightroom version of this tutorial?  Any questions?  Let us know what you think on Facebook and Twitter.

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<![CDATA[#HUDSONLOVESCHELSEA + Replichrome]]> http://www.gettotallyrad.com/blog/hudsonloveschelsea-replichrome http://www.gettotallyrad.com/blog/hudsonloveschelsea-replichrome post Wed, 19 Nov 2014 00:00:00 -0500

Husband and wife photo/video team, and Totally Rad! users, Danni and Wil Rivera wanted to do something different. “Everyday my social media feeds overflow with images from carefully curated and beautifully executed styled shoots,” said Danni Rivera. “Yes, they’re all different in a way, but the majority of them look the same. Beautiful models, beautiful details, beautiful venues.” Over a bottle of wine, the couple joked “Wouldn’t it be funny if Hudson and Chelsea got Married?” Their love for the furry members of their family inspired a fantastic, styled puppy wedding shoot called #HUDSONLOVESCHELSEA. With puppy treats, puppy invitations, and even puppy guests. “To us, it’s very important that our photo work and our video work look similar” says Danni. And to accomplish that, they turned to the Replichrome presets for Lightroom from Totally Rad. All the still photos and video clips for #HUDSONLOVESCHELSEA were processed with Replichrome. “Thankfully, I learned how crucial, beautiful, and simple presets are to the photo and video editing process early in my career and found Totally Rad!” said Danni. “I have never used anything else and probably never will!” To learn how to apply Replichrome presets to your video clips in Lightroom, check out our tutorial here.

Husband and wife photo/video team, and Totally Rad! users, Danni and Wil Rivera wanted to do something different.
Husband and wife photo/video team, and Totally Rad! users, Danni and Wil Rivera wanted to do something different.
Husband and wife photo/video team, and Totally Rad! users, Danni and Wil Rivera wanted to do something different.
Husband and wife photo/video team, and Totally Rad! users, Danni and Wil Rivera wanted to do something different.
Husband and wife photo/video team, and Totally Rad! users, Danni and Wil Rivera wanted to do something different.
Husband and wife photo/video team, and Totally Rad! users, Danni and Wil Rivera wanted to do something different.
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<![CDATA[PicTapGo Picks! 9/12/14]]> http://www.gettotallyrad.com/blog/pictapgo-picks-91214 http://www.gettotallyrad.com/blog/pictapgo-picks-91214 post Fri, 12 Sep 2014 00:00:00 -0400 PicTapGo Picks! 9/12/14

This week’s PicTapGo Picks celebrate the final moments of summer as warm nights give way to fall. Picks celebrate the final moments of summer as warm nights give way to fall.

Photo by @jelloet

Photo by @endre88

Photo by @Fifth_of_June

Photo by @abbie_melle

Photo by @Mamawithacamera

Photo by @miminguyenphoto

Photo by @coastalchickie

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<![CDATA[PicTapGo Picks! 9/5/14]]> http://www.gettotallyrad.com/blog/pictapgo-picks-9514 http://www.gettotallyrad.com/blog/pictapgo-picks-9514 post Fri, 05 Sep 2014 00:00:00 -0400 PicTapGo Picks! 9/5/14

This week’s PicTapGo Picks are an eclectic mix of gorgeous photos that have inspired us as artists. Picks are an eclectic mix of gorgeous photos that have inspired us as artists.

Photo by @Andreahanki

Photo by @makeitintosomethingbeautiful

Photo by @vickyvale8

Photo by @jasondomingues

Photo by @jkutzke

Photo by @fifth_of_june

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<![CDATA[Brooklyn My Way]]> http://www.gettotallyrad.com/blog/brooklyn-my-way http://www.gettotallyrad.com/blog/brooklyn-my-way post Thu, 04 Sep 2014 00:00:00 -0400

During her recent trip to Brooklyn, we asked our friend, Oriana Koren, to document her adventures using our Replichrome II: Slide Film for Lightroom presets. We caught up with her afterward to hear about the unique approach she took to her visit, and to see how it led to truly incredible photos and experiences.

If you ask anyone about Brooklyn, they’ll probably say things like ‘hip’ or ‘cool’ or mention Williamsburg. To me, Brooklyn has been synonymous with things like Jamaican beef patties, hip-hop, brownstones, and brown people. In the wake of the rapid gentrification of Brooklyn, along with numerous American cities, I wanted to explore the Brooklyn I’d heard about as a kid from my West Indian friends in middle school: Carnival, the Brooklyn Mos Def talks about in ‘Black on Both Sides’, the Brooklyn I came to love in Spike Lee films like ‘She’s Gotta Have It’, the Brooklyn I feared no longer existed because of gentrification.

With this in mind, I set out to document Brooklyn over the course of three days, my way, using the Replichrome filters exclusively. I wanted a little bit of the gritty, nostalgic feeling you get from shooting film to document this weekend. Thinking back on all the disposable cameras I would shoot on my early trips around NYC, I knew I wanted these images to have the feeling of snapshots but to look beautiful and carefully considered at the same time.

I gave myself a few rules for documenting and, most importantly, experiencing Brooklyn:

1) Have conversations with everyone. I wanted to get a sense of how folks felt about their borough and neighborhoods. For instance, one person gave me this little gem about Brooklyn: “You ask people from Manhattan where they’re from and they say ‘New York City’ but you ask people from Brooklyn where they’re from and they say ‘I’m from BROOKLYN!’ People here love their borough. They are proud to be from Brooklyn.”

2) Walk. As a photographer, walking is my main mode of transportation because it allows me to observe and seek moments to photograph. Walking also helps you feel like part of community you are visiting, as opposed to feeling like an outsider or tourist.

3) Skip Williamsburg. I wanted to challenge my notions about where to find “Brooklyn cool” while in Brooklyn. So, I stuck to neighborhoods that aren’t always first to be mentioned when talking about Brooklyn. The borough is so large and the neighborhoods are so varied that it’s worth it to explore places you might not always think to go.

I’ve never had a better, more fulfilling trip to NYC and I can’t wait to go back to Brooklyn again!

Photographer, Orian Koren explores Brooklyn through her own unique lens.
Photographer, Orian Koren explores Brooklyn through her own unique lens.
Photographer, Orian Koren explores Brooklyn through her own unique lens.
Photographer, Orian Koren explores Brooklyn through her own unique lens.
Photographer, Orian Koren explores Brooklyn through her own unique lens.
Photographer, Orian Koren explores Brooklyn through her own unique lens.
Photographer, Orian Koren explores Brooklyn through her own unique lens.
Photographer, Orian Koren explores Brooklyn through her own unique lens.
Can’t get enough of Oriana’s photos and insight? Learn more about her trip by visiting her on Instagram . She used the new Replichrome Mini filters for PicTapGo to edit the iPhone photos from her weekend in New York.
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<![CDATA[Connect Inspire Encourage Share]]> http://www.gettotallyrad.com/blog/connect-inspire-encourage-share http://www.gettotallyrad.com/blog/connect-inspire-encourage-share post Wed, 03 Sep 2014 00:00:00 -0400 PicTapGo Featured Photographer

Heather Lacroix lives on the beautiful West Coast of Canada. She loves all things quirky, gets giddy over good typography, and loves capturing the beauty all around her.

What does mobile photography mean to you?

“As cheesy as it sounds, mobile photography has played a huge role in my creative re-awakening. In my younger years, and all the way through school, photography, graphic design & art played a huge role in my life, it was my life. After I graduated from design school life took a few turns that took me away from the creative life, and for a long time I was busy just going about the everyday routine. It was good, but I was desperately missing that creative outlet. Along came Instagram and the chance to document life’s little moments as well as connect, be inspired, encouraged & share with other creatives, it’s a wonderfully amazing thing!” “The best part is now my boys are old enough to enjoy Instagram with me, while our subjects are different, we can share the creative experience together, and my daughter is still young enough that she doesn’t mind being my subject, although she is already showing a desire to be on the other side of the camera.”

What is your favorite PicTapGo feature?

“PicTapGo is beyond awesome! I use it for all my pictures. I love that you can layer filters, and it’s just all around easy to use. I almost always use Lights On, however, I find that I go through stages on the filters that I use, depending on the style mood I am currently in. Right now, I am loving the new Replichrome Mini filters , especially 400H.” , especially 400H.”

PicTapGo Featured Photographer
PicTapGo Featured Photographer
PicTapGo Featured Photographer
PicTapGo Featured Photographer
PicTapGo Featured Photographer
PicTapGo Featured Photographer
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<![CDATA[PicTapGo Picks: The Best of #Replichrome_Mini]]> http://www.gettotallyrad.com/blog/pictapgo-picks-the-best-of-replichrome-mini http://www.gettotallyrad.com/blog/pictapgo-picks-the-best-of-replichrome-mini post Fri, 29 Aug 2014 00:00:00 -0400 PicTapGo Picks: The Best of #Replichrome_Mini

Since the release of Replichrome Mini for PicTapGo , the incredible PicTapGo community has been sharing tons of gorgeous photos edited with the new filters. For this week’s PicTapGo Picks we’ve put together a collection of our favorite images tagged #Replichrome_Mini on Instagram . .

Photo by @angmthompson

Photo by @chardphoto

Photo by @joanna5600

Photo by @Endre88

Photo by @allyv

Photo by @Flaii

Photo by @christalp

Photo by @kenny_kim

Photo by @twodaintyflowers

Photo by @mackenzie

Photo by @kylaewert

Photo by @sduerre

Photo by @rikki_

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<![CDATA[Farewell Kodak BW400cn]]> http://www.gettotallyrad.com/blog/farewell-kodak-bw400cn http://www.gettotallyrad.com/blog/farewell-kodak-bw400cn post Thu, 28 Aug 2014 00:00:00 -0400

Photo by @orianakoren

We are sad to report that Kodak is discontinuing BW400cn. Kodak is discontinuing BW400cn.

The popular film stock will soon disappear, but 400cn’s fine grain, smooth tones, and exceptional sharpness are captured as presets in Replichrome I: Icon Film for Lightroom. To preserve 400cn’s legacy as a truly elegant black and white film, we’re offering our Kodak 400cn preset free as part of the Replichrome Sample Pack.

Get the Free Replichrome Sample Pack

PicTapGo Featured Photographer
PicTapGo Featured Photographer

Above are a few of test images we used while collecting data needed to developed truly accurate Kodak 400cn presets. For more information on the groundbreaking process behind Replichrome I: Icon check out our Making of Replichrome Infographic .

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<![CDATA[PicTapGo Picks! 8/22/14]]> http://www.gettotallyrad.com/blog/pictapgo-picks-82214 http://www.gettotallyrad.com/blog/pictapgo-picks-82214 post Fri, 22 Aug 2014 00:00:00 -0400 PicTapGo Picks! 8/22/14

Each week we feature some of our favorite photos from the #PicTapGo_App tag on Instagram. Thank you to the incredible photographers who make the PicTapGo Community such an incredible place. tag on Instagram. Thank you to the incredible photographers who make the PicTapGo Community such an incredible place.

Photo by @heyjuniorbeltran

Photo by @riecypiecy

Photo by @Rikki_

Photo by @grandmotherwolf

Photo by @iamparris

Photo by @jaredkidder

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<![CDATA[No Fancy Gear Required]]> http://www.gettotallyrad.com/blog/no-fancy-gear-required http://www.gettotallyrad.com/blog/no-fancy-gear-required post Wed, 20 Aug 2014 00:00:00 -0400 PicTapGo Featured Photographer

Kara Deyoung is an amateur photographer who loves capturing beauty and peace amid her sometimes hectic days spent documenting her family’ s adventures.

PicTapGo Featured Photographer

What does mobile photography mean to you?

I have always been passionate about photography, but to me it always seemed so intimidating. To create the kinds of images that I loved and admired, I felt like I would need better equipment, better editing tools, and not to mention twice as many hours in a day… with a growing family underfoot, it just didn’t seem like all that was within my reach. Mobile photography was a huge game-changer for me! I could easily snap a photo with my phone, no fancy gear required. Instead of feeling like I needed to spend hours learning editing tricks, with PicTapGo I was able to intuitively adjust my image to achieve the look I wanted. I’ve been able to develop my eye, play with light, and most of all “meet” and interact with photographers I have admired for years. And all during nap time!

What is your favorite PicTapGo feature?

PicTapGo is, hands down, my favorite photography app. For a hobbyist like me, I love how user-friendly it is. I think I’ve converted most of my friends and family to PicTapGo and I’m always amazed at the gorgeous images they are able to create! Although I have my favorite filters, Lights On, Skinny Jeans, and Milk and Cookies, to name a few, I really love using them all.

PicTapGo Featured Photographer
PicTapGo Featured Photographer
PicTapGo Featured Photographer
PicTapGo Featured Photographer
PicTapGo Featured Photographer
PicTapGo Featured Photographer
PicTapGo Featured Photographer
PicTapGo Featured Photographer
PicTapGo Featured Photographer
PicTapGo Featured Photographer
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<![CDATA[Introducing Replichrome Mini for PicTapGo]]> http://www.gettotallyrad.com/blog/introducing-replichrome-mini-for-pictapgo http://www.gettotallyrad.com/blog/introducing-replichrome-mini-for-pictapgo post Fri, 15 Aug 2014 00:00:00 -0400

New Filters for PICTAPGO

Capture the look of film with the Replichrome Mini filter set for PicTapGo. Replichrome Mini uses the process behind our groundbreaking Replichrome Lightroom Presets to combine the beauty of film and the flexibility of iPhoneography, right in your pocket.

Don’t wait to start developing a film look for your iPhone photos. Replichrome Mini is available now as an In-App Purchase from PicTapGo's "Tap" screen.

Available on the App Store

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<![CDATA[A Daily Journal]]> http://www.gettotallyrad.com/blog/a-daily-journal http://www.gettotallyrad.com/blog/a-daily-journal post Wed, 13 Aug 2014 00:00:00 -0400 PicTapGo Featured Photographer
PicTapGo Featured Photographer
Amanda Julca is an international editorial, portrait, travel and entertainment photographer, born and raised on a river in the Midwest, transplanted to tropical Miami Beach, Florida. Her work is a stunning study in textures and daily life.

What does mobile photography mean to you?

The ability to take images of my everyday life, as it’s happening and without the interference of my large DSLR has become a routine of mine, much like writing a daily journal. I’m able to look through all the images I’ve taken and recall precise moments relating to the image or the day it was taken.

What is your favorite PicTapGo feature?

I love being able to layer all my favorite filters to instantly create a style and representation of what and how I see. Since they were first released years ago, I’ve been using variations of Totally Rad! Actions in Photoshop on my professional portfolio. Now, having those similar features on the PicTapGo app readily available on my phone, I am able to keep that consistent style across the board. In the busy day-to-day, I also appreciate having an app that has such convenient sharing options and is so amazingly easy to use.

PicTapGo Featured Photographer
PicTapGo Featured Photographer
PicTapGo Featured Photographer
PicTapGo Featured Photographer
PicTapGo Featured Photographer
PicTapGo Featured Photographer
PicTapGo Featured Photographer
PicTapGo Featured Photographer
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<![CDATA[PicTapGo Picks! 8/8/14]]> http://www.gettotallyrad.com/blog/pictapgo-picks-8814 http://www.gettotallyrad.com/blog/pictapgo-picks-8814 post Fri, 08 Aug 2014 00:00:00 -0400 PicTapGo Picks! 8/8/14

This week’s #PicTapGo_App Picks are a celebration of smooth tones and color. Picks are a celebration of smooth tones and color.

Photo by @j0hnnych3ng

Photo by @endre88

Photo by @andrea_spence

Photo by @myeditblog

Photo by @jelloet

Photo by @adonohuephoto

Photo by @brebol

Photo by @joeyjoey143

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<![CDATA[Encourage the Creative Side]]> http://www.gettotallyrad.com/blog/encourage-the-creative-side http://www.gettotallyrad.com/blog/encourage-the-creative-side post Wed, 06 Aug 2014 00:00:00 -0400 PicTapGo Featured Photographer
PicTapGo Featured Photographer
After following photographers she admired on Instagram, Hannah Argyle was inspired to take her photography to the next level. Her work is a wonderful look at life in the British Midlands.

What does mobile photography mean to you?

Mobile photography has opened my eyes to a world, that a year ago, I was oblivious to. Through following photographers I admired on Instagram, I began to think more about composition, and realized that an interesting crop and editing can make a huge difference to an image. I have taken part in several daily projects on Instagram, which encouraged the creative side, and until recently I took everything with my iPhone. However, after buying a second hand DSLR and having two lessons I am increasingly in love with the subtlety and precision you can achieve. I find PicTapGo really enables me to enhance the light in my pictures.

What is your favorite PicTapGo feature?

I edit everything with my iPhone, and I love working with PicTapGo. Possibly, my favorite feature is that the sliders are very sensitive. I also love the way the filters can be layered as many times as you like without having a bring up a new file each time. I think the filters are very sympathetic, and I can enhance an image in a way that really suits my style, whereas I find other editing apps a little heavy handed.

PicTapGo Featured Photographer
PicTapGo Featured Photographer
PicTapGo Featured Photographer
PicTapGo Featured Photographer
PicTapGo Featured Photographer
PicTapGo Featured Photographer
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