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Don’t Be a Halloweenie!

October 27 2011

I LOVE Halloween, and I don’t use all caps lightly, which means I’m not messing around and I REALLY REALLY love Halloween.

It isn’t so much the ghouls and goblins part, it is because it is basically the least stressful holiday of all time (except for maybe Columbus Day, but who cares about Columbus Day? I digress). You don’t need to worry about cooking a big meal, if you’re spending it at your parents or your in-laws, all you need to do is put on some fake teeth, throw candy at kids, and try not to drink so much that you embarrass yourself. It is the perfect holiday.

I’ve decided to put my love for all things Halloween to good use,and create a handy guide to help photographers get the most from their All Hallows Eve.

The Pumpkin

After trolling the Internet I’ve come up with two great ideas for how to rock the age old tradition of carving a Jack o’ Lantern.

The first idea is to show off your rad career as a photographer and carve a camera onto your pumpkin using this fun stencil from the Ball State University Journalism Department.

The second idea is that you can carve your pumpkin into a camera by adding a twist to the shoebox pinhole camera exercise that is a favorite for Photo 101 teachers everywhere.

Materials:

  • Pumpkin
  • Foil
  • Tape
  • Needle
  • Black spray paint
  • Photo Paper
  • Developing Materials (This will require a trip to your local photo lab)

Instructions:

  • Step 1: Carve out the inside of the pumpkin, and cut a circle into the front for a place to put your pinhole shutter.
  • Step 2: Spray paint the pumpkin black, this will stop any light leaks, and keep your images from being foggy.
  • Step 3: Create your shutter by poking a hole into the tin foil, attaching it to the hole you’ve created in the pumpkin, and creating a flap to cover the hole, allowing you to control exposure.
  • Step 4: In complete darkness load your photo paper.
  • Step 5: Take an image by peeling back your shutter flap, and exposing between 30 seconds and 4 minutes depending on the light.
  • Step 6: Develop the images in your home darkroom (AKA your bathroom).
  • Step 7: Share your awesome pumpkin camera images on our Facebook page. We’ll totally send mugs to the first few people to post images taken with a pumpkin camera.
For more detailed instructions on how to setup a pinhole camera checkout this article on Instructables. The Pumpkin Camera photos are used under a Creative Commons license  from Crunchy Footsteps’ photostream.

 

The Costume

This section is by far the shortest because Tyler Card created the photographer themed Halloween costume to end all photographer themed Halloween costumes. He turned himself into a WORKING dslr. It takes pictures, and can even radio trigger his Alien Bee strobes! Don’t believe me? Checkout the video below.

Fully Functional Camera Costume from Tyler Card on Vimeo.

For slightly less ambitious photographer costume ideas be sure to checkout this post from PhotoJojo.

The Pictures

Few times of the year will lead to better pictures than Halloween. I could post a simple guide to taking better Halloween pictures, but a quick Google search will reveal enough of these to keep you reading until Halloween 2030. Instead I’ve posted some links to my favorite Halloween shoots for you to checkout for a little  inspiration before you get out there and start taking pictures.

The Treat

We have a snazzy RadLab recipe for you to help give your images a nice, spooky feel for Halloween. The recipe comes courtesy of Ellie Augustin, one of RadLab’s biggest fans.

 

You can download this Halloween treat by right clicking, and selecting “save as” on this link.

Be sure to share your own favorite Halloween traditions, ideas and photos with us on Twitter or Facebook

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